8bitfuture
8bitfuture:

Interplanetary Internet demonstrated from the ISS.
Astronaut Sunita Williams recently used a NASA developed laptop on board the International Space Station to control a Lego robot in Germany, demonstrating technology that could one day be used to build an ‘Interplanetary Internet’.
The traditional structure of the Internet has data transmitted using TCP over Internet Protocol (IP), which assumes a continuous path will exist between transmitter and receiver and sends a continuous stream of packetized data. Through space, however, the connection may suffer long time delays and not be so reliable.
To over come this, NASA and the European Space Agency developed ‘Disruption Tolerant Protocol’ (DTN) which transmits data using a ‘Bundle Protocol’ (BP), which is similar to IP. Data transmitted using the newly developed protocols travels hop by hop through routers to a destination, storing bundles of data until the next link becomes reconnected.
NASA hopes the system will one day allow humans on a spacecraft in orbit around Mars to operate robots on the surface, or from Earth using orbiting satellites as relay stations.

8bitfuture:

Interplanetary Internet demonstrated from the ISS.

Astronaut Sunita Williams recently used a NASA developed laptop on board the International Space Station to control a Lego robot in Germany, demonstrating technology that could one day be used to build an ‘Interplanetary Internet’.

The traditional structure of the Internet has data transmitted using TCP over Internet Protocol (IP), which assumes a continuous path will exist between transmitter and receiver and sends a continuous stream of packetized data. Through space, however, the connection may suffer long time delays and not be so reliable.

To over come this, NASA and the European Space Agency developed ‘Disruption Tolerant Protocol’ (DTN) which transmits data using a ‘Bundle Protocol’ (BP), which is similar to IP. Data transmitted using the newly developed protocols travels hop by hop through routers to a destination, storing bundles of data until the next link becomes reconnected.

NASA hopes the system will one day allow humans on a spacecraft in orbit around Mars to operate robots on the surface, or from Earth using orbiting satellites as relay stations.

  1. zombienoodledoo reblogged this from 8bitfuture and added:
    does this really look like Wall-E..?
  2. apolloepica reblogged this from 8bitfuture
  3. indiguy reblogged this from emergentfutures
  4. ultimateswagmaster reblogged this from 8bitfuture
  5. miguelazevedolourenco reblogged this from emergentfutures
  6. itsdds reblogged this from emergentfutures
  7. turing-machine reblogged this from emergentfutures and added:
    Oh my god, this is awesome! I really need to study more about networking ;_;
  8. gdfernandes reblogged this from thenextweb and added:
    Nossa. Isso sim é tecnologia de ponta.
  9. technoholics reblogged this from 8bitfuture
  10. l-7-l reblogged this from emergentfutures
  11. wilmotjg reblogged this from emergentfutures and added:
    The next frontier!
  12. themodernworld reblogged this from emergentfutures
  13. joaofilipetocaarir1998 reblogged this from emergentfutures
  14. kale-drogo reblogged this from emergentfutures
  15. sol-leks reblogged this from emergentfutures
  16. emergentfutures reblogged this from thenextweb
  17. grundmc reblogged this from 8bitfuture
  18. techpost reblogged this from rawjeev and added:
    Interplanetary Internet demonstrated from the ISS. Astronaut Sunita Williams recently used a NASA developed laptop on...
  19. finibits reblogged this from thenextweb and added:
    Lego Robot #Finibits
  20. powerslave reblogged this from marcushere
  21. the15thpear reblogged this from 8bitfuture
  22. marcushere reblogged this from 8bitfuture and added:
    Internet on future Mars: Astronaut 1: Hey I’ve always wondered where James Madison was born… Astronaut 2: Well you could...
  23. circuitzombie reblogged this from 8bitfuture and added:
    (via TumbleOn)